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20121201
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Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
counterterrorism, and then the u.s. ambassador to china, gary locke, on the relationship between the two countries. >> our first experience was to come in a different way than every other family up here. probably never happen again in history. and it's interesting because after dad was sworn in, we went and took a picture, photo of the family, behind the oval office desk, and that night we didn't get to move into the white house because nixon had left so quickly, so unexpectedly, they left their daughter and son-in-law, david eisenhower, to pack all their clothes and belongings. it literally took seven or eight days. we had to go back to our little house in alexandria, virginia, suburbia, the neighborhood was surrounded by secret service. we had been living there dad was vice president. and i'll never forget. that night mom is cooking dinner. literally, we're sitting around the dinner table, and mom is cooking dinner, and she looked over at my dad and goes, gerry, something is wrong here. you just became president of the united states and i'm still cooking. >> steve ford, linda johnson robb, and j
'm with the world journal. could you address growing chinese assertiveness in south china sea and east china sea? and given china just announced they will intercept the ship's that go into territorial waters. so are you going to participate in upcoming defense talks with chinese? and what message do you want to tell them? thank you. >> well, thank you for that question. of course the issues that are being placed today in a south china sea and other areas in the north and central, east asia, i think are quite complicated because of the nature of the territorial disputes, some of them historic, some of them now driven by the need for access to resources in those areas, and that's i think to some degree has motivated some of the activities that you see, seeing there. the u.s. position as you know is that we don't take sides on territorial disputes. there's many of those around the globe, not just in the south china sea. but we do want them resolve peacefully, without coercion. and that we call on all the parties there, including the chinese, to ensure that as they approach these problems that they
but also offer a great opportunity. you see, what i find in africa today is that china has an increasing presence on that continent. china has a plan when it comes to the future of africa. america does not. that's why i'm going to offer as an amendment to the tag bill, which is currently pending before the senate, the american jobs through greater exports to africa act. my partners on the bill are senator chris coons, senator ben cardin, john boozman and mary landrieu, as well as support in the house from representative chris smith. at the heart of this bill is the creation of jobs in america. exporting more goods to africa will help create jobs here. every $1 billion in exports supports over 5,000 jobs. i believe we can increase exports from the united states to africa by 200% in real dollars over the next ten years, and we can't wait any longer. if there are some who say africa is so backward and so far behind, what is it in the united states they can afford to buy if they even wanted to, that is old thinking. let me give you some new reality. in the past ten years six of the world's f
if it were any other way. let's take a step back and look how this looks if america jeects this treaty. china has joined, russia has joined. we are the country that set the standards on rights for the -- of the disabled. we want everybody to play by international rules. we lose credibility if we turn around and refuse to participate in a treaty that merely asks other nations to live up to our standards, our rules. i'd like to point out that we got a letter from the blind chinese dissident, guen chon chang talking about the plight of the disabled around the world and what a strong message it would send if the united states ratified this treaty. there's no reason why we can't say that we lived up to our obligations. we need to step up and do the right thing for bob dole and our veterans throughout the world. i'd like to enter into the record at this time a letter from the very well known internationally blind chinese dissident who recently left china miraculously and thank god for the efforts of our state department and our government. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. mccain: i quo
invited a number of us to go with them to china. it was quite an experience. senator stevens -- of course, another world war ii veteran -- had flown the first cargo play plane into what was then peking in 1974. and senator inouye was well-regarded in china for that service. and so the group of norse -- there must have been -- and so the group of norse -- ther of se must have been a dozen of us -- got together with the leaders of china. we were accorded every courtesy we could possibly be accorded because of the presence of senator inouye and senator stevens. they were like brothers. they called one another "brothers." they acted that way in private. they served that way in the senate as chairman and vice-chairman and vice-chairman and chairman of the appropriations committee. they single-handedly shaped our american defense posture and they did it with skill and pay troivmen--and patriotism and the that very few could have. several senators have mentioned how bipartisan dan inouye was. he was of the old school. not a bad school for today, in my point of view. he treated each senator with
. think about countries like china and germany. they're continuing to expand their wind industries in the renewable energy sectors. if we don't support our wind energy industry here and the wind manufacturing facilities we're effectively offshoring and exporting those jobs. our global competitors aren't hesitating. they're encouraging wind power development. and they know the longer we fail to act, literally the more wind they can steal from our sails. so enough is enough. this is an american industry. it needs to continue to be an american industry. but we risk everything, literally everything if we let the p.t.c. lapse in 18 days. so let's focus on this made in america potential. through it we can obtain energy independence. we can ensure energy security and we keep jobs in new mexico and colorado, minnesota, new york, every state in our great country. so let's not wait any longer. let's continue to build this clean energy economy right here in the united states. mr. president, let's do it today. the p.t.c. equals jobs. let's pass it as soon as possible. thank you, mr. president.
has two two -- [inaudible] where do syria people expect to go -- china, russia, support the assad's regime? >> we noted the opposition made gains, the assad continues to lose control over syria. it is no mystery that we were disappointed in the failure of the security council because of a lack of agreement by some members to take actionings through -- actions through the council with assad and work with our international partners to pressure assad and assist the people of syria and the opposition, that that work continues. >> represent china? >> i think i addressed that question. >> thank you, sir. >> john? >> thank you. the world's financial community is watching this fiscal cliff process closely with concern. the parties fail to reach a deal before jan -- january 1, what assurances do you have that america will not default on its debt? >> well, we addressed the issue of the debt ceiling, and the president's firm belief it is unconceivable that -- and unacceptable that leader in congress want to engage in brinksmanship witnessed in 20 # 11 on the issue of making sure the united s
taxpayers' dollars, the steel came from china. what are we doing to america and what are we doing to our manufacturing? i think we need a wake-up call. we're busy holding up the entire congress, protecting tax breaks for billionaires. when are we going to start looking out for american jobs? when we're talking about this fiscal cliff, we're not talking about having a jobs component in it. when are we going to start talking about tax breaks so we can have an infrastructure bank, so we can rebuild america using american products. and why is it when they say you want it made in america, they call us protectionist. well, i welcome the call of protection. i want to protect american jobs. i don't want them on a slow boat to china or a fast track to mexico. i might not ever get my steel mill back. baltimore might not ever have those jobs back but, you know, we've got to get serious in our country, what are our priorities. we have to start rewarding those industries that make products in this country. right now our whole code is oriented to protecting people who make money off of money. well, le
as in china we went and helped people in small businesses that have been wiped out temporarily to be able to come back, our fishing people deserve emergency assistance to tide them over and help them through this most critical time. i would turn to the senator from alaska and the senator from new hampshire, and ask what that means to the state of new hampshire if she might share with us. mrs. shaheen: my friend from massachusetts understands the challenges we have in new hampshire, as does senator whitehouse from rhode island, because, in fact, fishing is one of the oldest industries that we have in new england. and new hampshire it dates back over 400 years. because we have a much smaller coastline than massachusetts and rhode island, we have a smaller -- smaller group of people who earn their living through fishing, but they have smaller boats, and therefore they're more affected by some of the fishing regulations and some of the adverse weather conditions that have affected fishing. about 90% of the fishing that new hampshire's fishermen do is for cod and cod is the species that has be
rights violators wherever they might be, whether in russia or syria or sudan or north korea or china or any other country. in other words, the senate committee-approved bill wisely adopted a global magnitsky standard. the reasoning for this is sound. because while the mechanism of u.s. visa denial for human rights violators was inspired by a single case in a single nation, the principles that it seeks to advance are universal. this bipartisan committee bill, unlike the house-passed version of the magnitsky act that we will soon vote on, does not single out russian human rights violators for visa denial but would apply the visa denial mechanism to people from any country who violate important human rights standards. the united states should be clear and firm in its commitment to protecting human rights. wherever the violation occur. and to holding those who violate those rights accountable to the best of our ability. including denying them visas to come to our country. human rights do not end at the borders of russia and anyone who violates those standards as so many did so blatantly
back -- so it's a vast multitude on the planet but no self-government in russia, and china and india and africa, most of europe. you look back through the previous millennia and you have democracy and self-government existing in very few tiny city states, athens because they can't defend themselves militarily and even when it did exist people would speak the same language and worship the same god, the same climate and culture, a very small little area. that is all of world history. and you look today, democracy is half the planet. if you asked me what changed, what was the hinge of all of that i think i would say the word we the people. 225 years ago the hinge of world history because all of the conclusions at the time it was way better and more perfect and for the first time ever in the history of the planet, an entire continent got to vote on how they and their posterity would be, and there were lots of exclusions from our perspective that we wouldn't exist as a democratic country in the democratic world but for that. i would say it's the hinge of all modern history. before democra
met him when he worked with haley bailey 18 years ago in china. he was a great divan. he's a great guy now. i hope you're good to meet him. it hadn't been for him, we wouldn't be here tonight. so, and jackie, wherever she is. they are. without her the invitation list would have been a mess. i have no alan simpson for just over 40 years. i heard of the story sophisticated than i try to do them myself. and he helped me out of that hole. i worked 18 years. as press secretary in chief chief of staff responsible for all mistakes. [laughter] wayne al went to retire and went to harvard, i went to the smithsonian and was in charge of government for a wild man. my wonderful wife, rebecca who is right here. i'm telling you i could not have done this book without you. she did with research and out of me being up at 4:00 in the morning and she is amazing. so we went overseas and did a bunch of work with charities and children and blind people and lepers and came back and ended up on a sailboat in one day in 2005, the phone connected for some reason to some island power in your brain and it was all
the work with glen bailey and holly page. i met him 18 years ago in china. a great guy then to migrate dynel. if it hadn't been for him we would not be here tonight. so jackie, wherever she is. no, there. without heard the invitation list would have been a mess. i have known allen and simpson for just over 50 years. i grew up in wyoming. i heard all the stories and i was a kid and then i tried to do them myself. he helped me out of that. i worked 18 years. press secretary in the chief of staff, responsible for all mistakes. [laughter] when he went to retire and went harvard, i went to the smithsonian and those in charge of government. my wonderful wife, rebecca, who was right here, i'm telling you, i could not have been without her. she researched and put up the media before:00 in the morning and is amazing. so we were tired, when overseas and did a bunch of work for charities and children and blind people on the purse and came back and ended up on a sailboat. one day in 2005 the phone connected to some island to our. it rained. it was al simpson. he said, these guys want to write the
the russian point of view was that gorbachev also wanted to improve relations with china and japan. and with 100 inf missiles directed at him, how was he going to do that? it's really not in their interest to have 100 missiles out of europe. and it was really in their interest. now, we now have access, have for some years, records of the polit bureau discussions. and let me go back to a couple words about president reagan. before he first met gorbachev, he wrote out on a yellow pad several pages, without any prompting from anybody, what he wanted to achieve in geneva in his first meeting. this was handed literally to me as we are getting off the plane in geneva, saying this is what the president has on his mind. if he is wrong somewhere, we will have to straighten him out. actually, it was a very, very precise paper. and among other things, he pointed out that our biggest problems, one of these was a lack of trust. that he had to find a way to begin to create trust. we're not going to solve anything else. he also had it, if i don't achieve anything else, i must convince gorbachev t
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)

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